When you’re just getting started learning about the maker movement, local makerspaces are the perfect place to get started on your own projects!

Makerspaces can come in all shapes and sizes, and no two makerspaces are the same—some might feature more traditional supplies like crafting materials and LEGOs, while others might be fully-outfitted with 3D printers, laser cutters, and hand tools.

As long as they’re a place where people can gather to create, invent, tinker, explore, and discover using a variety of materials, they’re a “makerspace.”

We talked to Amber Straub, who’ll be hosting a soldering station with local makerspace Metrix Create:Space, about what she’s looking forward to this year:

soldering_space_2015 (more…)

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Tickets are now on sale for this celebration of creativity and ingenuity. This year Maker Faire invites you to explore the Maker movement with new projects and presenters, including:

Mario the Magician

mario-the-magicianNew York’s Mario the Magician has carved a name for himself with the high quality of his live comedic performance of magic and slapstick and the unique integration of hidden modern technology and robotics in his handmade props. Mario’s repertoire features all things made by hand, often using found/salvaged materials, and he encourages children to make, not buy. He has recently made appearances on Sesame Street, NBCUniversal’s Sprout Channel, and live at Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts.

The Walking Beast

walking-beastThe Walking Beast and the Moltensteelman Pyrosaurus came from the imagination and talent of Moltensteelman Studio in Salem, Oregon. The Walking Beast is a seven-ton mech robot that walks on eight legs and stands 11’ tall. Maker Martin Montesano spent over three years designing and building it, and put in over a mile of welds to bring this beautiful and functional creation to life.

All Seattle Mini Maker Faire ticket buyers will also be offered a special discount for EMP Museum admission which includes access to World of WearableArt™, Indie Game Revolution, Infinite Worlds of Science Fiction, Fantasy: World of Myth and Magic, and more. Purchase your ticket today to participate in hands-on demos for all ages, explore innovative arts and new technology, and enjoy interactive performances all weekend long.

Full list of makers to be announced in August 2016!

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Last year we welcomed 5,000 enthusiastic attendees and 120 makers presenting projects of all sorts and sizes. Whatever it is you love to make, we want you to show it off at the 2016 Seattle Mini Maker Faire!

As you prepare to apply for the Call for Makers, here are some helpful tips to keep in mind:

  • Be descriptive as possible about your project
  • Think about what your exhibit space will require to run
  • Provide good photos or video content, if available
  • Ask questions if you’re not sure about something (contact us at makerfaire@EMPmuseum.org)

We’re seeking makers of all ages including individuals, hobbyist groups, schools, non-profit organizations, and commercial businesses. Exhibits that are interactive or highlight the process of making things are especially desired.

For examples of projects, visit our Makers page or browse our 2015 archive.

We hope to see you at the Seattle Mini Maker Faire on September 17-18 at EMP Museum!

Application Deadline: June 20, 2016

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makey_robotAbout a week ago our Seattle Mini Maker Faire team members had an amazing time at the Global Maker Faire Summit in the City by the Bay—San Francisco! This eye-opening experience was an amazing opportunity to connect with and learn alongside over 100 producers from all over the world.

On the ground, the Maker Media team did an incredible job pulling everyone together and hosting a rewarding conversation on how to continue to engage our local makers and help our independently organized (but mighty!) event continue to grow and best showcase the wildly creative people here in our city.

We took a tour of the Exploratorium (a must-see in San Francisco!) and heard from Scott Weaver, who built this impressive sculpture, Rolling Through the Bay, entirely out of toothpicks! (We resisted the urge to touch.)

producers_group_summit_2016We also got to check out the American Steel Studios, a massive warehouse that houses an unbelievable amount of artists, welders, sculptors, engineers, and innovator projects. Don’t miss the innovative stuff happening here!

Needless to say, it was a great experience that’s getting us pumped to kick off the 2016 Seattle Mini Maker Faire. Call for Makers is coming in March—save the date for a special kick-off event on March 30. More info coming soon.

–Liz Y., EMP Museum

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Over 2,800 people participated in the workshops, interactive exhibits and presentations at Seattle Mini Maker Faire on June 2nd and 3rd at the Seattle Center.  We hope you were inspired to make stuff, to join a local maker space, or take apart your old printer and tinker with the components.  We gathered links to some videos to further inspire your creativity and kindle your desire to do something that requires safety goggles.

Here’s a little interview with me, Christin Boyd, at the faire and showing how we made Seattle Mini Maker Faire 2012.  Filmed and edited by Howard Gutknecht.

 

Technology with Intent crafted this short video showing artistic glimpses at some of the most visual and kinetic activities at Seattle Mini Maker Faire:

3D Video of Seattle Mini Maker Faire

Make Something

Oak Harbor High School RoboticsWe hope you enjoyed meeting the makers at the faire. You can take a class, rent awesome tools, attend a lecture, or join one of the maker groups who exhibited at Seattle Mini Maker Faire.  You can contact the makers through the their websites, which are listed on our Makers page.

Your kids can join a FIRST team, the Geek Scouts, or the Science Squad. We had two FIRST Robotics teams at Seattle Mini Maker Faire, Oak Harbor Robotics Club (pictured here) and Team XBot.

It’s hard to justify buying a laser cutter, or building your own metal foundry, so why not rent the workshop space and take a class from a pro at All Metal Arts, Metrix Create: Space, or Pratt Fine Arts Center?

Don’t you NEED a pair of metal wings like the ones from All Metal Arts (pictured below)?

Make something.  You’ll be glad you did.

-Christin Boyd, Producer, Seattle Mini Maker Faire

Here are just a few of the many workshops and activities at Seattle Mini Maker Faire 2012!

Cascade Science Squad

Cascades Science Center Foundation is a non-profit foundation dedicated to sparking children’s interest in STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) through hands-on activities that stimulate creativity, encourage exploration and inspire active learning for children to unlock their full potential.  At the Seattle Mini Maker Faire, the kids will have an opportunity to participate in fun science activities led by the volunteers of the foundation.

Cascade Science Squad - Real Science Real Fun!

Joy Guild’s Creative Reuse Challenge

The Joy Guild is a village of creative-minded people who seek fun, playfulness, and inspiration to live a happy life. (more…)

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Rob Flickenger and his Tesla Gun

You can also find the list of Makers and Workshops on the Makers page.

Saturday June 2, 2012

Start End Title Speaker
10:10 10:30
Unwise Microwave Oven Experiments
Bill Beaty
10:40 11:05
Mind-Controlled Robots
Joshua Madara
11:10 11:40
Citizens in Space
Edward Wright
11:50 12:30
Electronic Cloud Chamber (Radioactivity!) and Arduino Laser Show
Rich Olson
12:40 12:50
Holofunk
Rob Jellinghaus
12:55 13:25
Hazard Factory
Rusty Oliver
1:35 1:50
Folk Art painting on recycled objects
Ruth Moen
1:55 2:25
Computer Security 101, with Alice & Bob
Jerry Whiting
2:35 3:35
Thought 2 Thing in an Hour or Less – 3d Design and Print Workshop
Larry James
3:45 4:15
The Tesla Gun
Rob Flickenger
4:20 5:00
Resurrecting old computers
Jerry Whiting

Sunday June 3, 2012

(more…)

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Protein Chains with beads and pipecleaners

By Nina Arens

Designing a booth for Maker Faire may seem like an intimidating project. Festivals like these attract a broad demographic, a lot of questions, and all sorts of people with different interests and objectives. Combine it with the fact that visitors hardly ever linger at an exhibit longer than 8 minutes, and it may feel downright impossible.

But don’t fret! You are a Maker! You CAN make a fun, interactive exhibit!

Whether you’re a multimedia artist, a laboratory scientist, a basement tinkerer, or a vendor, every made object can have an interactive element. It may not seem apparent right away, but no matter how complex, all ideas are a built on simple foundations.

Design Take-Home Projects from Complex Ideas

Imagining just how a visitor could take home a piece of your display can be difficult. Especially if your project is a long process. Or requires special tools. Or an attention span.  Here are some ideas to help you do it with a little creativity.

Protein Chains with beads and pipe-cleaners

 

Protein Chains with beads and pipecleaners

Protein Chains with beads and pipecleaners

I wanted to convey how a cell makes its proteins to 4th grade girls at Bailey-Gatzert Elementary. Obviously, I couldn’t bring them to my lab, or have them visualize something. And certainly they wouldn’t sit still for a lecture. Instead, I adapted a beading activity to simulate the biological process in similar ways. At my booth, girls worked to thread and fold “pipe-cleaner proteins” using the letters in their names as a recipe. (more…)

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On March 3rd we hosted a workshop to help local makers design their booths and get ideas for interactive exhibits and hands-on activities. We will repeat the class in late April or early May. Here are some highlights from the workshop:

Part 1: Meet the team and General Booth Design


Key points: A few signs will help attendees understand your project, but don’t let the signs form a barrier between you and the public. Open shelving gives you more vertical space to display parts, projects, tools and components. Practice setting up your exhibit at home and test your hands-on activities with friends and kids.

Part 2: Examples of interactive exhibits


Key points: Let people see and touch.  Show some interesting raw materials, show what things look like in-process, half-way done, and parts that broke during your design trials. Let the public experience the process of making with all of their senses!  Great hands-on activities are ones that simplify the process to their essential components or symbolize complex things with simple analogs, for example make strings of beads as an analog for protein chains.

Part 3: Hacker Space booths and group exhibits


Exhibit what a group of geeks can accomplish with a little sharing of ideas, tools, and space.

Thank you to Steven Bradford, videographer,  from the Seattle Film Institute.

-Christin Boyd, Producer, Seattle Mini Maker Faire

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